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Archive for the ‘Vocational’ Category

Kurtis the Stock Boy and Brenda the Checkout Girl

January 20, 2012 2 comments

In a supermarket, Kurtis the stock boy, was busily working when a new voice came over the loud speaker asking for a carry out at register 4.  Kurtis was almost finished, and wanted to get some fresh air, and decided to answer the call. As he approached the check-out stand a distant smile caught his eye, the new check-out girl was beautiful.  She was an older woman (maybe 26, and he was only 22) and he fell in love.

Later that day, after his shift was over, he waited by the punch clock to find out her name. She came into the break room, smiled softly at him, took her card and punched out, then left.  He looked at her card, BRENDA.  He walked out only to see her start walking up the road.  Next day, he waited outside as she left the supermarket, and offered her a ride home. He looked harmless enough, and she accepted.  When he dropped her off, he asked if maybe he could see her again, outside of work.  She simply said it wasn’t possible.

He pressed and she explained she had two children and she couldn’t afford a baby-sitter, so he offered to pay for the baby-sitter.  Reluctantly she accepted his offer for a date for the following Saturday.  That Saturday night he arrived at her door only to have her tell him that she was unable to go with him. The baby-sitter had called and canceled. To which Kurtis simply said, “Well, let’s take the kids with us.”

She tried to explain that taking the children was not an option, but again not taking no for an answer, he pressed.  Finally Brenda, brought him inside to meet her children.  She had an older daughter who was just as cute as a bug, Kurtis thought, then Brenda brought out her son, in a wheelchair.  He was born a paraplegic with Down Syndrome.

Kurtis asked Brenda, “I still don’t understand why the kids can’t come with us?”  Brenda was amazed. Most men would run away from a woman with two kids, especially if one had disabilities – just like her first husband and father of her children had done.  Kurtis was not ordinary – – – he had a different mindset.

That evening Kurtis and Brenda loaded up the kids, went to dinner and the movies. When her son needed anything Kurtis would take care of him.  When he needed to use the restroom, he picked him up out of his wheelchair, took him and brought him back.  The kids loved Kurtis.  At the end of the evening , Brenda knew this was the man she was going to marry and spend the rest of her life with.

A year later, they were married and Kurtis adopted both of her children.  Since then they have added two more kids.

So what happened to Kurtis the stock boy and Brenda the check-out girl? Well, Mr. & Mrs. Kurt Warner now live in Arizona , where he is currently employed as the quarterback of the National Football League Arizona Cardinals and has his Cardinals in the Super Bowl.  Is this a surprise ending or could you have guessed that he was not an ordinary person.

It should be noted that he also quarterbacked the Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI. He has also been the NLF’s Most Valuable Player twice at the Super Bowl’s.

note: This story is a bit old. Kurt Warner is now retired.

story found at: inspirationalstories.com

photo credit: tradekorea.com

The American Dream

January 17, 2012 1 comment

An American businessman was standing at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish.

“How long did it take you to catch them?” the American asked.

“Only a little while” the Mexican replied.

“Why don’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?” the American then asked.

“I have enough to support my family’s immediate needs” the Mexican said.

“But” the American then asked, “What do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said: “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take a siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, senor.”

The American scoffed: “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds you could buy a bigger boat and, with the proceeds from the bigger boat, you could buy several boats. Eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman, you would sell directly to the consumers, eventually opening your own can factory. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually NYC where you will run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked: “But senor, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied: “15-20 years.”

“But what then, senor?”

The American laughed and said: “That’s the best part. When the time is right, you would announce an IPO – an Initial Public Offering – and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions.”

“Millions, senor? Then what?”

The American said slowly: “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take a siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos…”

 

story found at: rogerdarlington.me.uk

photo credit: animal-earth.com

A Million Dollar Lesson…

January 7, 2012 1 comment

A cab driver taught me a million dollar lesson in customer satisfaction and expectation. Motivational speakers charge thousands of dollars to impart his kind of training to corporate executives and staff. It cost me a $12 taxi ride.

I had flown into Dallas for the sole purpose of calling on a client. Time was of the essence and my plan included a quick turnaround trip from and back to the airport. A spotless cab pulled up.

The driver rushed to open the passenger door for me and made sure I was comfortably seated before he closed the door. As he got in the driver’s seat, he mentioned that the neatly folded Wall Street Journal next to me for my use. He then showed me several tapes and asked me what type of music I would enjoy.

Well! I looked around for a “Candid Camera!” Wouldn’t you? I could not believe the service I was receiving! I took the opportunity to say, “Obviously you take great pride in your work. You must have a story to tell.”

“You bet,” he replied, “I used to be in Corporate America. But I got tired of thinking my best would never be good enough. I decided to find my niche in life where I could feel proud of being the best I could be.

 I knew I would never be a rocket scientist, but I love driving cars, being of service and feeling like I have done a full day’s work and done it well. I evaluated my personal assets and… wham! I became a cab driver.

One thing I know for sure, to be good in my business I could simply just meet the expectations of my passengers. But, to be GREAT in my business, I have to EXCEED the customer’s expectations! I like both the sound and the return of being ‘great’ better than just getting by on ‘average'”

Did I tip him big time? You bet! Corporate America’s loss is the traveling folk’s friend!

 

story found at: inspireme.net

photo credit: taxidriversdirect.com

A Man of Value…

December 20, 2011 Leave a comment

I know the title of this blog is Success!, but I think Albert’s got it right with this quote:

“Try not to become a man of success but rather a man of value.”

–Albert Einstein

photo credit: rottentomatoes.com

What Is Character?

December 9, 2011 Leave a comment

This is from whatwillmatter, a great website that is all about how to develop good character. Hope you enjoy it!

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Here’s a riddle: You can hardly ever find it anymore — especially in politics or business. Lots of schools don’t teach it anymore. We want more of it in our children and in all the adults who interact with them. We want it from our bosses and the people who fix our cars. And most of us believe we have plenty of it.

What I’m talking about is character — or, more precisely, good character. So, what is character?

Technically, character is a morally neutral term describing the nature of a person in terms of major qualities. So everyone, from iconic scoundrels like Hitler and saints like Mother Teresa, have a character.

In most situations, however, when we are talking about a person’s character we are referring to the sum total of his or her moral qualities: is she a good person or bad person, is he worthy of trust and admiration or not.

So when we say someone has good character we are expressing the opinion that his or her nature is defined by worthy traits like integrity, courage, and compassion. People of good character are guided by ethical principles even when it’s physically dangerous or detrimental to their careers, social standing, or economic well-being. They do the right thing even when it costs more than they want to pay.

No one is born with good character; it’s not a hereditary trait. And it isn’t determined by a single noble act.

Character is established by conscientious adherence to moral values, not by lofty rhetoric or good intentions.

All Josephson Institute programs, including CHARACTER COUNTS! and Pursuing Victory With Honor, are based on the Six Pillars of Character, values that transcend cultural, religious, and socioeconomic differences. Those six values are trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, caring, fairness, and citizenship.

Efforts by parents, teachers, and others to instill these values are important, but ultimately, character is both formed and revealed by how one deals with everyday situations as well as extraordinary pressures and temptations. Like a well-made tower, character is built stone by stone, decision by decision.

The way we treat people we think can’t help or hurt us — like housekeepers, waiters, and secretaries — tells more about our character than how we treat people we think are important. How we behave when we think no one is looking or when we don’t think we will get caught more accurately portrays our character than what we say or do in service of our reputations.

Of course, our assessment of a person’s character is an opinion and it isn’t always right. Abraham Lincoln recognized an important difference between character and reputation. “Character,” he said “is like a tree and reputation like its shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”

Because the shape of a shadow is determined by the angle of light and the perspective of the observer, it’s not a perfect image of the tree. In the same way, reputation is not always an accurate reflection of character. Some people derive more benefit from their reputation than they deserve; others are better than their reputations.

Still, reputation matters. It determines how others think of us and treat us and whether we are held in high or low esteem. That’s why many people and organizations are so preoccupied with their image that they actually undermine their character by concealing or creating facts to make them look better. It’s ironic that reputations are often the result of dishonesty or the lack of accountability.

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My Two Cents: Helping people build good character is what this blog is all about. Take time today to think of one area you’d like to improve in, and then set a goal that will help you become a better person. True success, after all, lies not in what you own, but in who you are…

 

photo credit: kaneva.com

The Seven F’s

December 8, 2011 Leave a comment

I haven’t read the book, so I can’t recommend it, but based on this short synopsis it seems like it might be worth picking up.

I found this post at kiwiflossnz:

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The book What Really Works – Blending the Seven Fs for the Life You Imagine is by Paul Batz and Tim Schmidt, and without a doubt will be the next book I buy from Amazon. Their theory is that instead of trying to balance one’s work / personal life, we are better to blend the Seven Fs into our lives. So if you want to read the book, go here, and if you want Batz & Schmidt’s summary of the Seven Fs then read on.

Faith: Our spiritual life. Spirituality is a peculiar and amazing thing. We are all  spiritual beings — regardless their chosen religion, most humans find a source of identity and strength by listening to and nurturing their spirituality.

Family: Our loved ones. In the research for the book, more than 1000 college-educated, knowledgeable workers rated “family” as the most satisfying of the F’s, and they also said family was their highest priority for increasing their satisfaction.

Finances: How money funds our priorities. While some see our income on the rise, most people today see the opposite. Here’s the deal about finances: The only way to be truly satisfied with our finances is learn to be grateful for what we  have, not spiteful about what we don’t have.

Fitness: The health of  our body. In our survey, fitness finished dead last in satisfaction, and dead last in priorities. Fitness really should be easy, except for the fact that we have to eat less (and better), drink less alcohol and break a sweat more often. How’s your fitness — really?

Friends: The people who share our joys and disappointments. Our research reveals that women tend to be more satisfied with their friendships, and they also place a higher priority on friends. How are you doing with your friends?

Fun: The part of life that is playful and joyful. With so much of our life spent working, can’t we make it more fun? Would the people you spend the most time with describe you as fun?

Future: The hope that we have for ourselves and others. Future is less about optimism and more about the commitment we make to a better world. Future is a major driver for many entrepreneurs. How about you?

 

photo credit: online-coloring-pictures

Are You Part of the 1%

November 30, 2011 Leave a comment

Found this amazing statistic at the Manage Better Now blog…

“According to David Kohl, professor emeritus at Virginia Tech., people who regularly write down their goals earn nine times more over the course of their lifetime then people that do not.  He goes on to explain that 80% of Americans do not have any type of definable goals.  16% at least have goals, but have not written them down.  Four percent write their goals down, but fewer than 1% actually review what they wrote down on a regular basis.  Are you part of the 1%?”

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My Two Cents: When you commit to writing and reviewing your goals on a regular basis, you truly are joining an elite group of individuals. Recognize the fact that you are treading a path that few are willing to walk, and take a moment to congratulate yourself for going above and beyond the call of duty.

 

photo credit: iRunner blog