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Put the Glass Down!

January 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Once, a professor began his class by holding up a glass with some water in it. He held it up for all to see and asked the students, ‘How much do you think this glass weighs?’ ‘1 pound!’ ….’2 pounds!’ …..’3 pounds!’ ……the students answered.

‘I really don’t know unless I weigh it,’ said the professor, ‘but, my question is: What would happen if I held it up like this for a few minutes?’ ‘Nothing’ the students said.

‘OK what would happen if I held it up like this for an hour?’ the professor asked. ‘Your arm would begin to ache’ said one of the students.
‘You’re right, now what would happen if I held it for a day?’ ‘Your arm could go numb, you might have severe muscle stress & paralysis; have to go to hospital for sure’ ventured another student. All the students laughed.

‘Very good. But during all this, did the weight of the glass change?’ Asked the professor. ‘No,’ replied the students.’ ‘Then what caused the arm ache; the muscle stress?

Instead, what should I do?’ The students were puzzled. ‘Put the glass down’ said one of the students. ‘Exactly!’ said the professor. ‘Life’s problems are something like this. Hold them for a few minutes in your head; they seem OK. Think of them for a long time; they begin to ache. Hold them even longer; they begin to paralyze you. You will not be able to do anything.’

It is important to think of the challenges in your life, but EVEN MORE IMPORTANT to ‘put them down’ at the end of every day before you go to sleep. That way, you are not stressed, you wake up every day fresh, strong, can handle any issue, any challenge that comes your way!
Remember friend- PUT THE GLASS DOWN TODAY!

 

story found at: motivation-for-dreamers.com

photo credit: justglasssite.com

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The Only Thing You Control…

January 2, 2012 Leave a comment

“Your reputation is in the hands of others. That’s what a reputation is. You can’t control that. The only thing you can control is your character.”

Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

 

photo credit: www.turnbacktogod.com

Jessie’s Glove…

December 28, 2011 3 comments

I found this story at feelmotivated and wanted to share it with you. Perhaps, during this holiday season, you know somebody who has a small need. Why don’t you be the one to fill that need, just like this store manager did for her employee?

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I do a lot of management training each year for the Circle K Corporation, a national chain of convenience stores. Among the topics we address in our seminars is the retention of quality employees – a real challenge to managers when you consider the pay scale in the service industry. During these discussions, I ask the participants, “What has caused you to stay long enough to become a manager?” Some time back a new manager took the question and slowly, with her voice almost breaking, said, “It was a $19 baseball glove.”

Cynthia told the group that she originally took a Circle K clerk job as an interim position while she looked for something better. On her second or third day behind the counter, she received a phone call from her nine-year old son, Jessie. He needed a baseball glove for Little League. She explained that as a single mother, money was very tight, and her first check would have to go for paying bills. Perhaps she could buy his baseball glove with her second or third check.

When Cynthia arrived for work the next morning, Patricia, the store manager, asked her to come to the small room in back of the store that served as an office. Cynthia wondered if she had done something wrong or left some part of her job incomplete from the day before. She was concerned and confused. Patricia handed her a box. “I overheard you talking to your son yesterday,” she said, “and I know that it is hard to explain things to kids. This is a baseball glove for Jessie because he may not understand how important he is, even though you have to pay bills before you can buy gloves. You know we can’t pay good people like you as much as we would like to; but we do care, and I want you to know you are important to us.”

The thoughtfulness, empathy and love of this convenience store manager demonstrates vividly that people remember more how much an employer cares than how much the employer pays. An important lesson for the price of a Little League baseball glove.

Author – Rick Phillips  (Source: Heart At Work)

 

photo credit: life123.com

The Story of the Butterfly

December 26, 2011 Leave a comment

Found this at Motivational Well-Being. If you’re going through some trials at this point, I hope you’ll remember that it’s those trials that shape our character. Keep plugging along, and pretty soon the sun will shine down on you again.

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A man found a cocoon of a butterfly.
One day a small opening appeared.
He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours
as it struggled to squeeze its body through the tiny hole.
Then it stopped, as if it couldn’t go further.

So the man decided to help the butterfly.
He took a pair of scissors and
snipped off the remaining bits of cocoon.
The butterfly emerged easily but
it had a swollen body and shriveled wings.

The man continued to watch it,
expecting that any minute the wings would enlarge
and expand enough to support the body,
Neither happened!
In fact the butterfly spent the rest of its life
crawling around.
It was never able to fly.

What the man in his kindness
and haste did not understand:
The restricting cocoon and the struggle
required by the butterfly to get through the opening
was a way of forcing the fluid from the body
into the wings so that it would be ready
for flight once that was achieved.

Sometimes struggles are exactly
what we need in our lives.
Going through life with no obstacles would cripple us.
We will not be as strong as we could have been
and we would never fly.

 

photo credit: wondrouspics.com

Real Generosity…

December 23, 2011 Leave a comment

Real generosity is doing something nice for someone who will never find out.
Frank A. Clark

 

photo credit: community412

Choose to Be Kind…

December 23, 2011 1 comment

Found another great post at Tiny Buddha and thought I’d share it with you:

Editor’s Note: This is a contribution by Cary West

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” ~Plato

While volunteering my carpentry skills for Fundacion Uaguitupu on the outskirts of Panama City, Panama, I made a difference by assisting Kuna Indian communities in the renovation of their homes and churches. There was an abundance of necessary repairs, but unfortunately, funding could not keep pace with the work to be done.

After three months of doing what I could with the resources available, I had done little worthy of the evening news, yet a small patch of the world had become a better place because I had been there. Sadly, in many parts of the world it doesn’t take much to be considered an improvement.

I am forever amazed at the capacity of those who live difficult lives to treat others with kindness and compassion. I was welcomed into many homes, treated with great respect, and graciously thanked for my time in the community.

It is humbling to think that I have so much to give, when the truth is I have so much more to learn.

One of the most important things I’ve learned is that…

Each and every one of us can change the world!

Too many of us believe we have no power to make a difference. I have entertained the thought many times.

Making a difference often takes time, and our kindness may not grow roots until long after we’ve fertilized the flower beds. Focus on the act of giving, rather than the results of your actions. Detach from outcome, and you’ll be free to make a difference in ways you never imagined.

You don’t have to eradicate world hunger. Simply do something good everyday.

It’s not results that soothe our souls; it’s actions. In a difficult world, kindness has amazing power.

Every day people endure stressful jobs, demanding relationships, and backbreaking responsibility. Every day people battle life threatening disease, face uncertain futures, and struggle to survive.

Each moment of our lives, someone, somewhere, is in need of kindness.

What you do for others energizes the Universe. What you do for the Universe energizes you.

Go slowly. Breathe, smile and be present. Seek opportunities to make a difference, embrace the moments, and be grateful for every choice you make.

 

photo credit: whatwillmatter.com

When You’ve Lost Your Sense of Purpose…

December 22, 2011 Leave a comment

I’ve been having a ball rooting through the posts at Tiny Buddha. There’s so much great stuff there. Here’s an example of what I’m talking about. Perhaps you can identify with the problem of feeling like your life doesn’t have a greater purpose. If so,  I think following this post’s advice might just help you out.

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How can I lead a life of fulfillment again when many days feel without a center or a greater purpose?

Maybe you can relate to feeling a loss of purpose, and it doesn’t have to be the end of school. It might be that you’ve just lost a job, or your children might have just left home for college and you’re unsure how to proceed with your newfound empty nest.  Or maybe you’ve earned the promotion you’ve worked toward for years, and keep wondering how you’re going to top that success.

If you’re also starting over, remember:

1. Resist the urge to idealize where you were.

How easy to recall the pinnacles of school years, when I didn’t have the annoying reality of the 6 am alarm or the discomfort of writing friends living a thousand miles away.

If I am completely honest with myself, though, those years weren’t so stable either. With break-ups, mid-terms, and the RA who locked up the kitchen for three weeks because someone had taken another student’s yogurt from the refrigerator and wouldn’t fess, there was ample discord and struggle in the process of earning both degrees.

Just because you enjoyed your past, that doesn’t mean it will definitely top your future. If you resist the urge to idealize what you had before, it will be easier to focus on where you are now.

2. Remember that you are more than the sum of your accomplishments. 

I now have two advanced degrees, but I am so much more than that. The degrees represent past efforts, but education can’t determine whether I choose to uplift a neighbor’s day by dropping by to visit or make a friend’s daughter smile while teaching her to play Shoots and Ladders. Matters of kindness are up to me each moment.

When you’re not guided by a clear professional purpose, it’s immensely helpful to remember we are all so much more than what we produce.

3. You don’t need an extensive plan. You just need to take a step.

More than once, I considered going back to get a PhD. Ultimately, though, the prospect of another four years and more student loans made me concede that while it may be possible, it’s not exactly the right fit for me at this time. But what is next?

Beyond continuing to write, much of my future is inscrutable, even in my mid-thirties. What my degree dream really provided all those years was a false feeling of surety.

Did the scheduling, reading assignments, and syllabuses really spell out control? In reality there is no person, place, event, or schedule that will guarantee prolonged fulfillment.

So focus on the step you’re taking. Don’t worry about having it all figured out.

4. Remember that you are still growing.

What I’ve missed the most about grad school, besides the regular community of academic, literary companionship, is the comfort of a seemingly clear finish line. When days were dull or hard, I could always anticipate what it’d feel like to walk across that stage, to publish the manuscript I’d been workshopping so diligently for two years.

What I’ve found most troubling and difficult since school is the feeling of doing the same thing (working, paying bills, a bit of cleaning, a bit of cooking and laundry, then sleep and the same cycle all over again), without forward momentum.

On down days, I’ve reminded myself that I am still moving forward, even if it may not always feel like it. I’ve also learned that making tiny changes—trying a new recipe, taking different streets on my daily ride—can center me and focus my thought patterns. Moods, like life circumstances, are transitory.

Even if doesn’t always feel that way, we are continually learning and growing.

5. Believe that each moment leads to the best possible outcome. 

“You’ll remember these days all your life. Better enjoy them now,” my paternal grandfather was fond of warning. While there’s much joy in the energetic first blush of youth’s accomplishment, there is an equal truth in savoring each moment—right here, right now.

For this moment, I can value the knowledge I carry with me and use it in service of any jobs, communications, and acquaintances in my everyday life. For this moment, I can celebrate having strong legs to peddle my bicycle, healthy lungs to breathe during my morning meditation, a clear, curious mind to seek new books in subjects I savor, from fiction to spirituality and behavioral sciences.

Who knows what awaits—overcoming illnesses, starting to write the next novel, perhaps the challenge of marriage or the adventure of an adopted child, even a new job in a field I haven’t yet considered.

Until then, I don’t want to waste this day, this hour, even this minute feeling bereft that my purpose has already been met. It hasn’t yet.

And neither has yours.

photo credit: nextgent.com